Blog re-opens… let’s see how it goes…


Posted in site news

Okay, so the “blog” part of this site is back. I shut it down and deleted every single “blog” post long ago, pretty much only leaving the more article-y pages (and there’s a lot of crap that needs to be cleaned out of them, too).

The truth of the matter is that I don’t really like “blogging” very much. I love writing, but I’m not a big fan of “blogging”; I find it tedious and it seems that — as soon as someone says their site is a blog — there’s an expectation of producing several posts every week, month in/month out.

I have no intention of reinforcing nor living up to that expectation because, frankly, I don’t think there’s that much “news” and excitement in the TEFL sphere about which to blog several times a week anyway.

However… I could well be wrong.

And if it turns out that I’m wrong, then I’ll blog more often.

Who knows? I may even learn to like it! :shock: :razz:

Your ideas, comments, and additions are – as always – very welcome and if you fancy submitting a “guest blog post”, please don’t hesitate to contact me.

Okay, let’s see how this goes! :grin:
Leslie

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2 Responses to “Blog re-opens… let’s see how it goes…”

  1. Kevin Hakoda Kevin Hakoda says:

    Most informational news letters work best if you keep the content short, and in the main email. The less people have to click away from their email, the better chance that they'll respond. Most people have short attention spans, and you may have noticed this. Perhaps you could try a blog-length e-newsleter twice a month. If you feel that you need more space to write on a topic, it can always be continued into the next newsletter.

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    •  Leslie says:

      Heya, Kevin

      Interesting idea. Thanks for suggesting it. I'll certainly take it on board. For example, one of my most-read newsletters (i.e. that I read; not write) is published purely via email — with no archives.

      But I also like the discussion that erupts online based on posts linked to in other newsletters I follow. I get an email announcing a new post, take a look, and join in the discussion. Or if not join in (coz who's got something relevant to contribute every time, right?), at least quite often learn from or get a giggle, or discover something a commenter has linked to (which I'd never have found otherwise), and so on.

      Your suggestion is not one to be tossed away based on these comments, though. I'll mull it over some more…

      Re: attention spans…

      Indeed, people do have short attention spans and, consequently, I wonder how they hope to learn anything to any degree of competency, let alone mastery. "Sound-bite Education," huh? :) Dog help us.

      I'm inclined to think that attention span correlates directly with interest/motivation. For example, many of us will happily spend hours searching the internet or a library database or an online bookstore for particular information on a topic (or whatever – it doesn't have to be information, it could be an item of clothing or a piece of software or any number of things).

      And everyone I know is always saying "Ah, hang on…. I've got 27 browser tabs open here… give me a sec…"

      So my position — although, obviously, I could be entirely wrong — is that if someone is reluctant or just couldn't be bothered to click through (and away from their email client), they're flat out not interested enough in the topic. Or, if not the topic, that particular writer/publisher/company/etc.

      Thoughts?

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